Join The Rohingya Justice Campaign

60 Minutes | All | Indoors

Create solidarity artwork and join the campaign for justice for the Rohingya children forced to leave their homes.



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Join The Rohingya Justice Campaign

60 Minutes | All | Indoors

  • A4 card
  • Big pieces of card
  • Craft materials (for example, tissue paper, pipe cleaners, stickers)
  • Coloured pens or pencils
  • PVA glue
  • Scissors
  • Rohingya justice campaign FAQ
  • Outline person
  • Marium's stor

  1. Before you begin
  2. Gather your friends or family for this activity
  3. Read through the ‘Rohingya FAQ’ sheet so you’re ready to explain the Rohingya crisis to everyone
  4. campaign, email scouts@savethechildren org uk – they’re happy to help
  5. Play river crossing
  6. The person leading the activity should use tape, chalk, or rope to make two lines on the floor to make a river
  7. Everyone should get into groups of between six and eight people
  8. The person leading the activity should give each group some cardboard – there should be fewer pieces of cardboard than people in the group
  9. Everyone should try to cross from one side of the river to the other using the cardboard
  10. They should balance, squeeze onto a few pieces, and pass pieces to the front
  11. If anyone touches the river (any part of the floor between the two tapes), they’re lost and they should go and wait at the start
  12. The team that gets everyone across in the fastest time wins
  13. Everyone should gather together and chat about how well their team worked together
  14. Was crossing the river challenging? Would they do anything differently next time?
  15. The person leading the activity should explain that while this was a fun game, some young people have to cross rivers to escape violence and persecution
  16. Introduce the Rohingya crisis
  17. The person leading the activity should explain the Rohingya crisis
  18. They should use the ‘Rohingya FAQ’ sheet to find out more and answer any questions
  19. The Rohingya people are a stateless ethnic group (who are mostly Muslim) who have lived in Myanmar for centuries
  20. Myanmar’s in South East Asia – it’s one of the world’s poorest countries
  21. It was ruled by an oppressive military for almost 50 years; although it now has a democratically elected government, the military are still very influential
  22. The Rohingya people are often called ‘the most persecuted minority in the world’
  23. They’re not recognised as citizens of Myanmar, have no formal right to services like education and healthcare, and their movement is restricted
  24. The Rohingya people have experienced persecution and violence for decades
  25. Violence against the Rohingya people increased from August 2017
  26. The Myanmar military used attacks by small groups of Rohingya people to justify attacks against all of the Rohingya population, including children
  27. In September 2017, 6,700 Rohingya people were killed by the military
  28. Entire villages were destroyed and burned
  29. 700,000 Rohingya people had to leave their homes to escape the violence
  30. Two thirds of those people are children
  31. The nearest safe place for them to go was Bangladesh – another of the poorest countries in the world
  32. Bangladesh struggled to cope with so many refugees arriving at once
  33. Chat about the Rohingya crisis
  34. The person leading the activity should use the ‘Marium’s story’ sheet to tell everyone about one person’s experience of the crisis
  35. Everyone should think about what the biggest problems facing the Rohingya people are
  36. Everyone should think about whose responsibility it is to help the Rohingya people
  37. They should think beyond the practical support they need, and think about whose responsibility it is to protect their rights and hold people to their legal responsibilities
  38. If your group is ready, you could chat about the role of campaigning in holding governments accountable for their actions
  39. Explain the UK’s role
  40. The person leading the activity should explain that the UK government is powerful and influential within the United Nations (an organisation that tries to maintain international peace and develop friendly relations and cooperation between nations)
  41. The UK government can bring global attention to situations where groups are committing war crimes against children
  42. War crimes include things like killing civilians (people who aren’t in the army or police), taking hostages, or using child soldiers
  43. The person leading the activity should explain that the UN could refer the Myanmar military to the International Criminal Court and get justice for the Rohingya people – but so far, they haven’t – so the military isn’t being punished
  44. The person leading the activity should ask everyone if they think that the UK government should use its power and influence to help get justice for the Rohingya people
  45. Does anyone have any ideas of what they could do to influence the children?
  46. The person leading the activity should explain that people can tell Dominic Raab (the Foreign Secretary) that they care what happens to Rohingya children and their families – and that they want the UK to stand up for them
  47. By doing this, people can make sure the Rohingya people aren’t forgotten, and can speak out against the violence and persecution they’ve already experienced
  48. Stand up for Rohingya children
  49. The person leading the activity should explain that Save the Children have organised a campaign that aims to get the UK government to stand up for Rohingya children
  50. The person leading the activity should explain that the campaign involves young people in the UK sharing their hopes and goals for the future with Dominic Raab, to show him that all children should have the same rights – no matter where they live
  51. At the moment, young people in the UK are free to think about what they want to do with their futures, from the everyday goals (like learning to play an instrument) to the big dreams (like becoming an astronaut)
  52. Right now, the Rohingya children don’t know what the future will hold for them
  53. Everyone should think about their hopes and dreams
  54. They should think about how they’re different from the Rohingya children’s
  55. Everyone should create a solidarity figure, filled with their hopes and dreams for their futures
  56. They should get creative – they could write a poem inside the outline, draw, or write a campaign slogan
  57. The person leading the activity may give everyone a ‘Person outline template’ sheet, or they may ask them to draw their own person outlines
  58. Everyone should think about whether there’s anything else they could do to show their solidarity with the Rohingya children
  59. For example, they could draw around someone and fill in the outline together with writing, drawing, and collage
  60. They could also create a paper doll chain with one person for each member of the group, to show their connection with each other and the Rohingya children
  61. Everyone should send their finished artwork to Save the Children with the name and address of their group and some contact details (so Save the Children can let them know once they’ve handed the work to the government)
  62. It’s best if you can send the original artwork to Meg Briody, Save the Children, 1 St John’s Lane, London, EC1M 4AR, but you can also email photos to scouts@savethechildren org uk
  63. Save the Children will gather all the artwork together and deliver it to the Foreign Secretary

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